Athletics and Recreation

The Mountain Bike Dictionary | 9 Things MTBers Say

The Mountain Bike Dictionary | 9 Things MTBers Say


(dirt scraping) – Welcome back you beautiful people. Now today we’re going to be
exploring the linguistics of mountain biking. Yes, the language that has
been somewhat developed over the years through the
mountain bike community. Now, kick it off with
the first one, Richard. – That’s quite right, Blake. Today we’re going to be
getting a little bit radical. – Oh. – Possibly a bit gnarly. – Well that’s two of them. – I know, shall we go down the trail? – Yes.
– And send it? – Let’s drop in. – Tally ho! – Henry, I mean, Richard, ha! Oh Richard, lovely day, isn’t it? – Tally ho, tally ho, what, what? – (mumbles) This trail is sick, dude. Whoa! – Oh my God. – Dude, hang on man,
this is flippin’ gnarly. So you have to jump across the road. – I’m not sure on this
one, this is a gnarly gap. If ever there was a
better descriptive word, gnarly is it for this one. – Shall we go for it? (record player screeching) – Let’s do it.
– More gnarly. – Let’s get gnarly, get,
get, get, get gnarly. – Let’s stop saying gnarly. But that is gnarly. (hard rock music) – I feel gnarly just looking at it. – Oh Rich, I’m scared! – Man, come on, just follow me in! This is gnar– – [Narrator] Gnarly. An adjective. Dangerous, yet challenging and enjoyable. (record player screeching) – Well this trail looks cool. – Yeah that looks good. – Rooty man. – There’s a lot of line
options going on there. – Do you know what roots mean in the wet? – Sketchiness.
– Sketchiness, dude. – I’m slipping trying to get up it, so coming down is going to be? – Sketchy!
– It is. – It’s going to be sketchy
with like four lines to choose. – Some ruts, some roots running across it. – Rich, what is this going to be like? – Sketchy. (hard rock music) – Oh my gosh Richie.
– Oh my God, mate! – Richard, this is so sketchy!
– Man, I’m sketchy as! – [Narrator] Sketchy. The dictionary definition of sketch, a rough or unfinished drawing or painting, often made to assist in making
a more finished picture. (record player screeching) – Maybe we should hit this trail. I heard it’s wild. – It’s super wild, I’ve heard
there’s some gnar in it, man. – There’s some proper gnar
sections coming down this one. – Proper gnar sections. (rock music) – [Narrator] Gnar. Noun, used to describe
trails or sections of trails that are dangerous or
particularly difficult to ride. Derived from gnarly. (light classical music)
– Let’s hit it, like narwhal. – Let’s do it! – Hooray. Drop in! (hard rock music) – [Narrator] Dropping in. Verb, a declaration from a
rider that they’re about to start descending down a trail and that their friends
should be aware of this. (hard rock music) – Oh dude, like, that’s why I’m slow, ’cause 29ers don’t go around
corners that quick, man. That’s why I can’t keep up with you. It’s true! – I had to stop and flip my climb switch, I had it locked out. Like, honest, it was locked
out, I couldn’t keep, I had to stop. I did, I promise! – [Narrator] Racing driver’s excuses. – I had to stop and flip my climb switch, I had it locked down. – Dude I think I running a bit too high. – Blake. Blake. Blake! Wait, there’s a funny noise. I’ll catch you in a minute, Blake. There’s a noise. (record player screeching) – Hey Rich, what’s the time? – It’s about 12 o’clock–
– No dude, it’s time to get loose! (yelling) (hard rock music) – [Narrator] Getting loose. Verb meaning not being 100% in
control when riding a trail, but in a good way. – Oh jumps, I hate jumps. – Oh my God! I nearly died! (hard rock music) – [Narrator] I almost died. Phrase. An exaggeration, a harrowing
event happened during a ride that almost caused the rider to crash. Always told at the end of a piece of trail when a rider catches up with friends. (hard rock music) – Nearly died, yeah. (beatboxing) Cup of tea, cup of tea, cup of tea. Whoa, dude! You shrelped that man! Woo! Look, shrelped it, yeah! (hard rock music) – [Narrator] Shralp. A verb meaning vigorously
turn a corner so that the characteristic shrelp noise is made. – (laughing) Oh Rich, this bit looks so sick. Shall we shred it dude?
– We got to shred this place, it looks awesome.
– I’ll follow you. – Let’s go!
– Dropping in! (hard rock music) Let’s shred it. – [Narrator] Shred. Verb, meaning ride in an excited manner. – Cool nozza. – Woo! Thank you. Man this trail is sick. – That way’s too sick for me. Just shred it. – Yes! It’s so good. (light classical music) – Oh smashing day, Richard. – Real top notch stuff. – Oh yes, absolutely had
a sick time on the trail. – Terribly good. – We sent some gnar. Well hopefully this has given you somewhat of an understanding of the linguistics of a mountain biker. What sort of language they come up with out on the trail to
express their feelings. – Yes, I had a terribly fun time today, terribly fun getting sendy. – Oh yes.
– We dropped in. – We did drop in didn’t we? – Oh did we ever drop in. – Into a gnarly arse trail. – God, was it gnarly? – Yes, hopefully you’ve enjoyed
this lovely video of ours. If you would like to click
the globe to subscribe, because you are rather missing
out on some great content. – And if you’ve had a sick time, give us the thumbs up. – Yes, don’t forget, there’s
two videos on the screen, to continue to binge watch.
– Oh, smashing. – Of the GMBN, ta-rah!


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